In defense of the sanctimonious women's studies set || First feminist blog on the internet

Shameless Self-Promotion Sunday

Promote yourself.


Netiquette reminders:

  • we expect Content Notes as a courtesy to our readers for problematic content in linked posts and/or their comment threads (a habit of posting only triggering/disparaging links may annoy the Giraffe (you really don’t want to annoy the Giraffe))
  • extended discussion of self-promotion links on this thread is counter-productive for the intended signal-boosting –  the idea is for the promoted sites to get more traffic.  If it’s a side-discussion that would be off-topic/unwelcome/distressing on the other site, take it to #spillover after leaving a note on this thread redirecting others there.

38 thoughts on Shameless Self-Promotion Sunday

  1. Hi, I’ve been reading Feministe articles for a long time but never had the nerve to comment.

    I’m writing a novel entitled Leah Far-Sighted, which is an intersectional feminist critique of Supernatural starring queer women of color. The first draft of the back-cover text, the tag to follow for daily progress reports and snippets (I won’t have time for NaNoWriMo in November, so I’m doing it in September instead), and encouragement and comments are very welcome.

  2. What does Miley Cyrus get wrong about borrowing elements from other cultural groups that parody artists don’t?

    I find myself hanging out with a very diverse group of friends, as far as dietary needs go. How do you throw a dinner party for vegans, vegetarians, omnivores, and paleo eaters?

    I respond to Mrs. Hall letter to teenage girls on Facebook. Long before Facebook ever existed, some parents demanded their children “delete” me for my clothing choices, too. I hope I can teach my own daughter more compassion.

  3. Too often both women and men confuse looking sexual with being sexual. Not surprising in a society that so often judges women by how well they conform to a narrowly defined cultural ideal. Pretty sad to limit women’s sexual enjoyment and autonomy in this way. It’s something that I had internalized in the past, and can still struggle with. Hence, my interest in writing this post:

    Looking Sexual vs Being Sexual
    http://broadblogs.com/2013/09/04/looking-sexual-vs-being-sexual/

  4. I wrote about back to school hell (when your kid is gone).

    And life after Olivia: “In the empty passenger seat next to me, I see my teenager kicking off flip flops and putting her small, dirty feet up on the dashboard, splotches of blue nail polish in the center of each tiny nail on each adorable little square toe.”

    Here’s the link: ttp://www.thenotebooksofmotherx.com/archives/481

  5. In a second post, I wrote: “‘Parenting is, by definition, co-dependent,’ my therapist said to me more than once as I watched myself become obsessed with the overwhelming job of trying to do what I could to keep my kid safe.”

    “Olivia and I have struggled to fathom each other’s angst, and faced with her desire to fall asleep and never wake up, my anxiety increased, becoming a toxic cocktail laced with adrenaline and dread that the morning would come when I couldn’t rouse her. ”

    http://www.thenotebooksofmotherx.com/archives/492

  6. I wrote a thing! Or rather, reposted an essay I wrote in the winter. It’s on Doctor Who (specifically, “Midnight”), and race and gender dynamics in the episode with regard to muted group theory. The essay is here. Feedback welcome, here or there! (I know DW is not terribly anon-friendly at times.)

  7. A post on Shahzia Sikander, a Pakistani-American artist credited with bringing a resurgence in miniature painting. Her work with video, animation, and performance brings a contemporary twist to Indo-Persian miniatures.

    The Museum of Fine Arts Boston is currently exhibiting She Who Tells a Story, a show featuring twelve women photographers from Iran and the Arab world.

    And check out this week’s Female Gaze Friday: In Shizuka Yokomizo’s Dear Stranger project the artist sends a mysterious letter, asking strangers to stand in front of their window for ten minutes at night to be photographed.

  8. First time I’m commenting here, even though I’ve checked this site out for lord knows how long.

    I’m currently working on a pilot for a cartoon that could use support from people. The main character is a teenage sorceress working and her job as a potion-maker. A mix of fantasy and cartoon comedy, based on a comic book I did.

    I think some of the readers may find it interesting. I realize that not many cartoons have girl protagonists, so here’s hoping this can help.

    Here’s the link. Be sure to watch the video!

  9. Warning: discussion of female genital mutilation/cutting and male circumcision

    I read a lot about Cliteracy this week — a NY artist’s amazing campaign get us to talk about and understand the clitoris — and I wanted to delve into what I see as the campaign’s most necessary, direct impact: spreading information about clit repair surgery for FGM/C victims.

    I also wrote about Pennsylvania’s Bruce Hanes, a county clerk who decided to start issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples despite the state’s ban, and why more local officials need to follow his lead.

  10. Kay Hymowitz strikes again. In a new article, ”Do Women Really Want Equality?“, the author of a book with a sensationalist title – Manning Up: How the Rise of Women Is Turning Men Into Boys – is trying to convince us that women don’t really want equality. Her article is peppered by the statistics of the gender gap in various fields and professions, yet her tone is very dismissive. While offering no counter-statistics or rebuttal, she skirts the issue by saying that numbers are just that and don’t tell the whole story.

    http://disruptingdinnerparties.com/2013/09/06/yes-ms-hymowitz-we-do-want-equality/

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